#005/006 train

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Runs
1-2 times a week

Travel time
4 days

Distance
6266 km

26 stops
on the way

The train #005/006 is an international train operating between Moscow and Ulan-Bator along the Trans-Mongolian rail route. The train runs once a week during the high season and once every 2 weeks during the low season (winter). The train has 1st and 2nd class compartments and a restaurant car. The train mainly consists of rather old but well-kept carriages which were produced in Germany over 20 years ago. These carriages are gradually being replaced with new ones.

First-class is a compartment with two lower berths on the same level. Second-class compartments are designed for four persons with two upper and two lower berths. There are 2 WCs per each carriage.
The train runs along Lake Baikal during the daytime giving its passengers an opportunity to enjoy the beautiful landscape. This train is unique because it is frequently filled with Russian and Mongolian traders with their goods. The police may also make more careful inspection of the compartments due to this high trade activity.

Schedule

  • 006З
    98:55
    Trip time
    23:55
    Moscow Yaroslavsky
    06:50
    Ulan Bator
  • 006Ч
    98:55
    Trip time
    23:55
    Moscow Yaroslavsky
    06:50
    Ulan Bator
  • 006Щ
    99:05
    Trip time
    23:45
    Moscow Yaroslavsky
    06:50
    Ulan Bator
  • 006Ь
    98:55
    Trip time
    23:55
    Moscow Yaroslavsky
    06:50
    Ulan Bator
  • 005В
    98:36
    Trip time
    15:22
    Ulan Bator
    13:58
    Moscow Yaroslavsky
  • 005Щ
    98:36
    Trip time
    15:22
    Ulan Bator
    13:58
    Moscow Yaroslavsky

Train 003/004 Moscow to Ulaanbaatar

4.48 based on 18 customer reviews

Top Things to See in Ulaanbaatar

When arriving in Ulaanbaatar aboard the Mongolian train you will definitely want to check out some of the Mongolian capital’s most impressive sites.  Ulaanbaatar is the capital of Mongolia and home to half of the country’s population. It was founded in 1639 as a nomadic Buddhist settlement, and as well as being the centre of Mongolian religious and cultural life, Ulaanbaatar was an important trade hub on the routes between China, Russia and Europe. Visiting the Mongolian capital will be an unforgettable part of your journey along the Trans-Mongolian Railway. What can you see there?


Mongolian history

The National Museum of Mongolia is the oldest and largest museum in the country, and should be your first port of call to learn about local history and culture. Its collection spans 800,000 years – the Palaeolithic Age, the Mongol Empire led by Genghis Khan, and Mongolia during the Soviet period – in 46,000 exhibits including jewellery and ethnic costume, religious items, and Mongolian ger (yurt) and furnishings. It is located on the capital’s main square, Sukhbaatar Square.

Mongolian culture

The most exciting way to experience Mongolian culture is at the National Naadam Festival, the biggest celebration in the country. ‘Naadam’ means ‘games’: the festival involves wrestling, horse racing and archery, sports which were a mainstay of Mongolian nomadic life and remain popular in the county today. Naadam is celebrated all around the country, but the largest is the National Naadam Festival which takes place in mid-July in Ulaanbaatar.

Mongolian religion

Since the collapse of the USSR Mongolian national identity has undergone a steady revival, including the resurgence of Mongolian Buddhism. The local religion was banned under the Soviets and most monasteries, temples, holy books and religious items were destroyed by them. Two surviving landmarks are the Choijin Lama Temple Museum and Winter Palace of the Bogd Khan.

The Choijin Lama was the official oracle of Mongolia until his death in 1918, and the Choijin Lama Temple Museum is a complex of six places of worship built for him in the early 1900s. The Choijin Lama’s brother was the Bogd Khan, the ruler of Mongolia. The Winter Palace of the Bogd Khan comprises several palaces and temples rich with Buddhist artwork and the possessions of the country’s last ruler.

Mongolian art

To get acquainted with millennia of Mongolian art, you should visit the Zanabazar Fine Art Museum and the Mongolian National Modern Art Museum. The first is named after medieval religious leader Zanabazar and showcases 16,000 artworks dating back to ancient civilisations, including Zanazabar’s sculptures, papier-maché masks created for religious Tsam dances, and paintings depicting nomadic life. The latter was separated from the fine arts museum in 1991, and displays contemporary Mongolian paintings, sculptures and prints, as well as fostering development and appreciation of Mongolia’s art scene today.

Get ready to be whisked along on a smooth and magical ride on the Trans-Siberian Railway.

Purchase your ticket safely and securely, then relax and let your train adventure begin!

Culture for Kids

A portion of your order goes to helping underprivileged Russian children.

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